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Conversation with Denise Zabalaga: We Are All the Other June 19 2008 San Rafael Photojournalist Denise Zabalaga grew up in Switzerland with her Italian mother and Bolivian father. Italian and Spanish were spoken at home. When Denise was sent to school she didn’t know the German spoken there, an experience that gave her a lifelong feeling for, and identification with, the outsider. The experience brought with it the gift of being free from the projection of fear and mistrust upon the stranger. Instead of fear, Zabalaga has a deep interest in people of other cultures and has been able to look past the media coverage of the other that ... Jul 6, 2008, 15704 reads


 

Greeting the Light: An Interview with James Turrell It was thanks to artist Walter Gabrielson that I was able to get in touch with James Turrell. Gabrielson was an old friend of Turrell’s from Pasadena and, like Turrell, also a pilot. The prospect of meeting this remarkable artist was exciting and arranging it took some persistence. Michael Bond, who managed Turrell’s projects around the world, was encouraging, but he suggested some homework. I should go to Los Angeles to experience one of the artist’s pieces in a private collection there, The Second Meeting. Although I was already familiar with Turrell's ... Mar 22, 1999, 293594 reads


 

Threshold Choir: An Interview with Kate Munger: February 27, 2010 Inverness, California As I drove up to Inverness on a Saturday morning a light rain fell intermittently and as I neared town, the clouds began to break up a little. Turning off Sir Francis Drake soon I was on Vision Road. Following my jotted notes, the roads became smaller and then the pavement ended. I faced a steep dirt road and wondered if the car could manage it in the rain. And where was I? The car did climb the road and it wasn't long before I was walking up a driveway hidden among the moss-covered trees.       I first heard about Kate Munger and the Threshold Choir from artist ... Apr 17, 2010, 24560 reads


 

Annalena's Painting Advice: A tutorial from Leigh Hyams' granddaughter Leigh Hyams sent me the following notes. —Richard Whittaker "I found this script today in a forgotten portfolio. It was dictated to me by my four-year old granddaughter, Annalena, who could not write then, but she knew how to advise people to paint and draw. I like her advice enormously, not to mention her attitude..." — Leigh Hyams, San Miguel Allende, Mexico Excerpts from Annalena's advice on painting and drawing:  • Take some paint, some colors, and with your paintbrush, put one color on your paper and take another color on top. Mix it ... Feb 10, 2009, 8173 reads


 

A Conversation with Joan Di Stefano: The Action of Light It was a Saturday open house at John Toki’s Leslie Ceramics, a mecca for Bay Area clay artists of all kinds—an all-day affair with demonstrations, exhibitors, raffle prizes, hot dogs, socializing and the good cheer that seems to accompany all those who work with clay. John had given me my own table to display copies of works & conversations. There must have been ten or fifteen such tables and people had been circulating, cross-pollinating and having a good time. And now the party was starting to wind down.          I’d left ... May 11, 2012, 93898 reads


 

Kitchen Teachings: Conversation with Cherri Farrell At the time of this interview Cherri Farrell was teaching Consumer and Family Science at College Park High School in Pleasant Hill, California, a subject that used to be called "Home Economics." What I found so inspiring in our conversation is as true today as it was in 2010.—RW Farrell's curriculum is devoted largely to cooking and nutrition and it's also indirectly a support for math, reading and other academic subjects. But what's not an explicit part of the curriculum, and yet perhaps is the most important in Farrell's eyes, is the development of ... Nov 18, 2010, 11173 reads


 

A Conversation with Melanie DeMore: Sound Awareness The music program at St. Paul’s Episcopal School in Oakland, California opened my eyes. I have grandkids there and have been treated to several of their school concerts. Every student, from the kindergarteners to the sixth-graders, performs. The performances, under the tutelage St. Paul’s several music teachers, have always been impressive. Striking is the eclecticism of the music chosen, the quality of the children's performances and the musical versatility of the instruction that is always in plain evidence. Listening to my first concert there, it was immediately ... Nov 30, -1, 57063 reads


 

A Conversation with Zilong Wang: Medicine Journey The quiet directness of Zilong Wang, his articulate, measured way of speaking and something so open about him makes an immediate impression. Who is this young man? If one is around Zilong very much at all, there’s soon no doubt that there’s something remarkable about him. As I got to know a little more about Zilong, I resolved very quickly to ask this young man for an interview before he left the Bay Area. I found it impossible not to think that what lay ahead for Zilong has promise for what I can only call the greater good. He accepted my proposal for an ... Feb 14, 2016, 9411 reads


 

Interview: Charles Bigger--On Philosophy: Baton Rouge, LA I met with retired professor of philosophy Charles Bigger at his home in Baton Rouge on a typically hot and humid day in July. Before long an afternoon squall materialized and rain was falling heavily straight down ouside. Sitting comfortably inside, the sound of the rainfall provided the perfect background for a philosophical conversation. Richard Whittaker:  You mentioned earlier that you wouldn’t call yourself "a philosopher." I was interested in that remark. Charles Bigger:  Yes. I was educated in a tradition which has now died out. It was largely ... Aug 18, 2002, 20543 reads


 

Interview: Leigh Hyams: This Incredible Fact of Being Alive I’d arrived early. It was easy to miss the door at 545 Sutter Street. It opened into a narrow foyer where one suddenly felt transported back to the San Francisco of the 1950s. Deciding against the rickety elevator, I chose to climb the narrow stairs hidden in the back. On my very first visit to Meridian Gallery I’d been charmed by the place, by the feeling I was revisiting an era when the Beats were just getting going.      No one could mistake Meridian as a place dedicated to art as a saleable commodity. There was a different ... Nov 21, 2005, 27781 reads


 
 

A Man Impossible to Classify One of my first experiences in San Francisco was of being flagged down by a ... Read More 720666 views


The Dumpster      “We can’t use these. They look like ... Read More 140389 views


Cotton and Silk Vorbeck quilt, detail I’m working on the last panel of a pair of ... Read More 8030 views


Say Grace I am deeply delighted to live on a planet that is so big and varied that I can ... Read More 4908 views


A Conversation with Silas Hagerty I met Silas, a young man in his twenties from New England, at a servicespace.org ... Read More 60403 views


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A Man Impossible to Classify One of my first experiences in San Francisco was of being flagged down by a ... Read More 720666 views


Interview with Bill Douglass—Jimbo's Bop City and Other Tales At the time I'd first gotten to know the widely respected jazz musician Bill ... Read More 363112 views


Greeting the Light It was thanks to artist Walter Gabrielson that I was able to get in touch with ... Read More 293594 views


Interview: Gail Needleman Gail Needleman teaches music at Holy Names University in Oakland, California. ... Read More 188890 views


Interview: Stephen De Staebler John Toki encouraged me to interview his old friend and mentor, sculptor Stephen ... Read More 150246 views


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